Trivia Tuesday: The Inventor

Gum illustration JPG.jpgWe often think of Henry Flagler as the first millionaire to recognize Palm Beach as paradise. One of the wealthy industrialists who beat him here, however, made what product?

  1. The stop sign
  2. Tutti-Frutti chewing gum
  3. Shredded Wheat breakfast cereal
  4. The zipper

Answer: It was the gum. While all these innovations dated to the late 1800s (the stop sign was conceived in 1890, but not put into use for 25 more years… yikes!), it was Thomas Adams who discovered that Mexican chicle produced a smooth, snappy chewing gum. His company produced the first flavored gums – licorice and fruit – inventions that were almost literally eaten up by the American public. He made a fortune, and spent some of it on Palm Beach real estate.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

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A Dog’s Life

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Photo courtesy of Mounts Botanical Garden

You love the Mounts. Surely, your best friend will, too.

Saturday, Feb. 26, will be the very first Dogs’ Day in the Garden at the Mounts Botanical Garden.

“This is the perfect opportunity for an entire family – dogs included – to visit the garden, take a walk on the winding paths, meet other pooch pals and heel for photo opportunities,” says Rochelle Wolberg, interim director of programs at Mounts.

Visitors will have the chance to learn about dog-related nonprofits, shop, enjoy dog-friendly vendors, and meet home-seeking canines from a local dog rescue organization. There will be water and treats for the canine guests.

The event will run from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; it’s free for members and only $5 for non-members. Mounts Botanical Garden is at 531 North Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Visit the website for more information, or to download a complete list of guidelines about bringing dogs to the garden.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

The Art of Sound and Music

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Image by Ken Brower & Deborah Ory, courtesy of Holden Luntz Gallery

Go, right now, to the Holden Luntz Gallery at the southwest end of Worth Avenue, just next to the Everglades Club.

What you’ll find surpasses art, surpasses photography, surpasses dance and transcends to the altitude of angels, still images that somehow capture sound, movement, costume and performance.

The gallery hosts “The Art of Sound and Music” from February 22 through March 18. The 30-image collection surveys the photographic representations of music and dance, using one art form to document another.

It’s the Beatles, it’s James Brown, it’s the New York City Ballet. It’s breathtaking.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

Take Me to Nicklaus Village

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Once upon a time, your best chance for a great view of the Honda Classic-clinching putt was to:

  1. Be one of the golfers in the day’s final pairing.
  2. Be one of those players’ caddies.
  3. Be in front of a television.

No longer.

At this year’s Honda, played this Thursday through Sunday on the Champion Course at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, you can enjoy the action from the Legends Club at Nicklaus Village, an enclosed ground-level box and private, front-row viewing patio at the 18th green.

Cut underneath the elevated skyboxes, the Legends Club is a 2,000-square-foot, climate-controlled hospitality venue with floor-to-ceiling glass. Wide-screen televisions will be programmed to The Honda Classic’s national telecasts. The menu will include full breakfast and lunch offerings, upscale seafood and carving stations and a full bar.

“The Legends Club at Nicklaus Village is the highest-level individual ticket we have ever created,” says Honda Classic Executive Director Ken Kennerly. “It’s our version of high-end, exclusive hospitality.”

Legends Club Tickets are $750 and are sold for individual days. Grounds tickets, Bear Trap tickets and other hospitality tickets and packages for the 2017 Honda Classic are on sale on the tournament website or by calling (844) 846-6328.

This year’s field includes Luke Donald, Jason Dufner, Ernie Els, Rickie Fowler, Sergio Garcia, Padraig Harrington, Charles Howell III, Martin Kaymer, Graeme McDowell, Louis Oosthuisen, Ian Poulter, Rory Sabbatini, Adam Scott, Vijay Singh, and Camilo Villegas.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

A Little Class

There’s a little something for everyone at the Seaview Avenue Recreation Center.

Spring classes begin the week of March 27. Registration for town residents begins Tuesday, Feb. 21, with non-resident registration starting Monday, March 13.

Adult classes:

  • Ballroom dance
  • Karate
  • Painting/drawing
  • Digital photography
  • Toning
  • Stretching
  • Yoga
  • Languages (French for beginners, intermediate/advanced French, conversational French, Spanish for beginners, Spanish for high beginners, Italian for beginners, and intermediate/advanced Italian)

Classes for preschoolers:

  • Mom & tot tumbling
  • Tot tumbling
  • Kindermusik
  • Start Smart baseball
  • Storytime soccer

Youth programs:

  • Karate
  • Gymnastics
  • Communications prep
  • Basketball camp
  • Spring soccer
  • Fencing

Register by phone at (561) 838-5485, in person at the Recreation Center (340 Seaview Ave., Palm Beach… but you’ll have to go tomorrow, because it’s closed for Presidents Day). You can also visit  www.palmbeachrecreation.com.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

Palm Beach Chic

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Photos reprinted with permission.

Palm Beach homes, Palm Beach gardens and Palm Beach life, written by a Palm Beach girl – someone with stories to share and the kind of access you only get when you’re a lifelong friend.

palm-beach-chic-coverThe book is Palm Beach Chic (The Vendome Press, 312 pages, $75), a gorgeous volume that’s witty, understated and urbane – much like Palm Beach itself.

Author Jennifer Ash Rudick moved to the island when she was 12, and gives us the insider-est possible perspective on the homes, their histories and their occupants. The book (graced with jaw-dropping photographs by Jessica Klewicki Glynn) celebrates the architects, interior designers and garden designers who’ve made each home perfect.

“Since its early days,” Rudick notes, “Palm Beach has been synonymous with awe-inspiring structures.” Awe-inspiring, yes, and anything but cookie-cutter. You think you know what a Palm Beach mansion looks like? Not possible. Whether a Regency estate, a Mid-Century Modern apartment, or a “surf shack” on Billionaire’s Row, the only standard is excellence.

Inside the description of each house is the description of the way life is lived in each house: “Days are spent en famille,” Rudick writes in the chapter about the Gumdrop House. “The mornings begin on the eastern loggia with coffee… tennis is at 11:30, followed by a buffet lunch on the western loggia at 1:30.” So very civilized.

And then there are the laugh-out-loud stories. Chronicling the massive renovation at Casa Amado: “A rustling in the entry hall turned out to be a fox the size of a German shepherd.” Moving into a vintage second-floor Worth Avenue flat: “Their belongings had to be hoisted through a window by crane. ‘We’re never leaving. We can’t!’ says the wife.”

Interior fabrics and furnishings are meticulously sourced. And the art… oh, the art.

These homes are showplaces, every one, without a hint of conspicuous consumption. Each chapter is a vignette in one grand Palm Beach story. In the end, it all comes down to one thing: Taste. Exquisite taste.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

Fashion Scholarship Fund

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Photo courtesy of Neiman Marcus

Palm Beach has a vested interest in keeping the fashion industry supplied with fresh talent. And so, on March 9, Neiman Marcus will host the annual Fashion Scholarship Fund luncheon/ fashion show/ champagne reception, this year featuring the latest from Manolo Blahnik. (No telling whether this $895 snakeskin pump will appear, but we think it’s particularly Palm Beachy.)

Iris Apfel will be there; she’s the honorary chair (of course). The event will surely sell out, so snap up your ticket now. You can purchase an individual ticket for $275, a Designer Sponsorship for $3,500 or a Donor of Distinction Sponsorship for $5,000.

Since its inception, the Fashion Scholarship Fund has awarded millions of dollars in scholarships to thousands of students worldwide. It grants approximately two hundred $5,000 scholarships annually, in addition to four outstanding Geoffrey Beene scholars ($30,000 scholarships to pursue education and career goals), and four more $10,000 awards.

As further support to scholarship recipients, the fund facilitates internships with prestigious fashion companies and provide career mentoring by prominent senior executives. Participating companies have included: Calvin Klein, Global Brands Group, Nautica, Phillip Van Heusen, Vera Wang, Michael Kors, Fishman & Tobin, Ross Stores, Ralph Lauren, Macy’s, The Men’s Wearhouse, Perry Ellis, Bloomingdales, Levi Strauss & Co., Kenneth Cole and Tommy Hilfiger (honored last week at the Palm Beach Civic Association’s annual awards luncheon).

For more information, call (212) 278-0008.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

Palm Beach Visual Arts

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Cover photo courtesy of Pelican Publishing Co.

Palm Beach has long been home to those who seek after beautiful things – to create them, to cherish them and to collect them.

In her new book, local gallery owner and author Deborah Pollack weaves the story of Palm Beach’s history as told through 125 years of its artwork. Palm Beach Visual Arts (200 pages, Pelican Publishing Co., $34.95) wraps its narrative around every conceivable art form – painting, photography, jewelry, architecture, sculpture, ceramics, and fashion.

Produced in collaboration with the Historical Society of Palm Beach County, the book introduces us to dozens of painters, photographers, sculptors and collectors. Its pages open with the earliest artists to work on the island, including George Wills Potter, who sketched island life for his real estate company brochures. We read the story of how Pan of Rohallion (still residing in Pan’s Garden) became one of the nation’s earliest pieces of public art. The book walks us through several eras and into the present day, where you’ll meet our own Sandra Thompson, longtime cover illustrator of the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide.

Palm Beach artists and art lovers have always lived passionate and interesting lives, and Pollack also explores their romances, relationships and heartbreaks. As charming as Palm Beach itself, the book perfectly captures the sense that the island’s history, people and art have been woven together since the first brushstroke.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

Trivia Tuesday: Mr. Khan

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Courtesy of New York Social Diary

Mr. Otto Kahn never quite gained the caché of some of the other early Palm Beach elite. It wasn’t for lack of trying; Khan first visited the island in 1916 and soon supported the Palm Beach Art League, built an impressive home on Sunset Avenue, was a shareholder at Palm Beach Stores (a purveyor of gourmet foodstuffs for the early/wealthy “pioneers”), and became a partner in Palm Beach Estates. He and his wife, Addie, belonged to the Bath & Tennis Club, Seminole Golf Club, Oasis Club, Palm Beach Yacht Club, Palm Beach Country Club, and the Palm Beach Angler’s Club, (later the Sailfish Club), and he was a member of the Palm Beach Men’s Club and the Palm Beach Gridiron Club. Khan even thought about buying Whitehall. But he earned lasting fame for a different reason. What is it?

  1. Working as a waiter in New York City, Charlie Chaplin once got a generous tip from Kahn. Chapin later carried a cane in his movies as a tribute to Kahn’s kindness.
  2. Khan, an opera fan, coined the phrase, “It’s not over ’till the fat lady sings.”
  3. Khan asked his Saville Row tailor to add a vest to his suits, to help guard against chilly autumn days in Maine (the Kahns had a home in Cold Spring Harbor). In doing so, he inadvertently invented the three-piece suit.
  4. Khan may have been the inspiration for Monopoly’s “Mr. Moneybags.”

 

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Hasbro

Answer: 4. Khan’s Palm Beach holdings were but a small part of his portfolio. The German-born railroad/banking tycoon owned high-end properties all over the country. His Long Island home, Oheka Castle, had a golf course, a palatial formal garden and a private landing strip. It was among the largest private residences in the country, second only to the Vanderbilts’ Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. The Monopoly character certainly bears a strong resemblance to Khan (though some say it was based on businessman J.P. Morgan). The cartoon tycoon was later renamed Milburn Pennybags.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

 

The New Formal

the-new-formalInterior designer James Aman’s portfolio is proof that traditional style doesn’t equal old school. “Early on I realized that my client base represented a new generation of collectors,” he writes in his new book The New Formal. “They respected classic traditions but savored the beauty and drama of cutting-edge art. Their vision of formal living replaced the Old Masters, heavy tapestries, and ornate furnishings of previous generations with contemporary, often provocative works of art that inspire and delight in brighter, more open spaces.” This is an aesthetic all of us can embrace.
Architectural Digest

On Thursday (Feb. 16), The Palm Beach Book Store welcomes designer Jim Aman to a reception and signing for his book, The New Formal. The volume celebrates the cutting-edge version of “formal” that Aman has brought to interiors from New York City to the Hamptons – and closer to home, a Palm Beach Regency and an oceanfront apartment in The Breakers.

Aman’s designs create serene but sumptuous settings for his clients’ collections. His goal is to integrate contemporary, often provocative works of art into spaces that inspire and delight the collectors and complement the way they live. Aman steers well clear of bare-bones, minimalist boxes; the landmarked homes are luxuriously personal and welcoming spaces.

Thursday’s event runs from 5:30-7 p.m. at the The Palm Beach Book Store, 215 Royal Poinciana Way. Please RSVP via email, or telephone (561) 659-6700.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.