Moving to Palm Beach County: The Un-Tourist Guide

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Author Marian White (left) with PBAU’s Vicki Pugh.

3D Book Cover ShotWhen the first image that greets you is the Midtown Beach clock tower, you’d imagine the island of Palm Beach would be well-represented. In Marian White’s new book, Moving to Palm Beach County: The Un-Tourist Guide, you’d be right.

While the book explores the experience of moving to Palm Beach County in general, the island features prominently. Flip through its pages, and you’ll find photos and references to all that’s iconic about living at the higher end: Polo, the Lake Trail, Worth Avenue, The Breakers, Lilly.

“The island of Palm Beach is unlike any other place in the world,” White told us. “While there is certainly truth to the fabled mystique surrounding the island, there is also a lesser-known hip side with young entrepreneurs, trendy new restaurants, a booming arts scene – and just lots happening in and around Palm Beach. It’s not as sleepy a place as some may think, and it is a great place to live and visit. You don’t have to own a beachfront property to appreciate the beauty here. From the clean, well-lit streets to the dreamy, well-manicured hedges, anyone can appreciate the exquisite attention to detail throughout Palm Beach.”

White’s book is, indeed, an un-tourist guide for living in a very tourist-y place. Evidence? She’s nailed it on the restaurants locals know and tourists (generally) don’t. The book is more than just a catalog of things to do and places to visit; there are guest-written sidebars on topics that include:

  • Things to consider when buying a boat
  • Elite equestrian sports
  • Where to shop (and a browse through five Worth Avenue boutiques)
  • Florida architecture and design

In his book-jacket praise, one local Realtor calls the book “a house hunter’s dream come true.” Clearly, the primary audience is anyone moving (or considering a move) to Palm Beach County. But we couldn’t help thinking that it’s an awfully nice reference book for those of us who already live here.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

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A Back-to-School Boxing Match

Shoebox art.jpgIf your kids are like our kids, they’re a little bit bored by now. Camp is over, they’ve caught all the Pokemon in the neighborhood, and it’s not the night before school starts (so there’s no real reason to get moving on the summer reading).

You have to go back-to-school shopping anyway, so why not make this year’s trip extra-fun? You can join the Town of Palm Beach United Way’s Boxed for Success School Supply Drive, decorate shoebox(es) any clever way you like, and fill them with new school supplies for disadvantaged kids. It’s a sweet project that will make a big difference in the life of a child.

Need more incentive? All decorated shoeboxes will be entered to win prizes in the following categories:

  • Best overall ($200 Amazon gift card)
  • Most creative ($25 Carmike Cinemas gift card)
  • Best theme ($25 Carmike Cinemas gift card)
  • Most color ($25 Carmike Cinemas gift card)

Here’s a school supply wish list (please make sure all items are new): Crayons, pencils, washable markers, blunt-tip scissors, notebooks, cap erasers, colored pencils, glue sticks, pencil sharpeners, wide-rule loose-leaf paper, pencil pouches/boxes, rulers, and bottles of white glue. Include your name and contact information inside the box. The United Way will use that information to thank participants and enter them in the contest.

Drop boxes at the Town of Palm Beach United Way (44 Cocoanut Row, Suite M201); The Palm Beach Daily News (400 Royal Palm Way, Suite 100); any Palm Beach Fire Rescue station; UBS Financial (440 Royal Palm Way, Suite 300); Brown Harris Stevens (353 Worth Avenue); or the Palm Beach Recreation Center (340 Seaview Avenue).

If you’re not feeling creative but still want to help, don’t fret. All donations are welcomed and appreciated, even if they’re not in a decorated box. This year’s beneficiaries are three Palm Beach County elementary schools (Palm Springs, Pioneer Park and Pine Grove) where the majority of students come from low-income homes.

For more information, visit the Town of Palm Beach United Way website or call 561-655- 1919.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

Trivia Tuesday and the Statue Man

When did Palm Beach become an actual town… and why?

  1. Trivia Tuesday logo JPG1894. For tax purposes, Henry Flagler needed to establish his railroad and hotel properties in an incorporated municipality.
  2. 1898. That’s the year Alligator Joe was paid a princely sum of $900 by Sir Edward and Lady Colbrooke of England, for the simple task of bagging an 11-foot alligator for them to stuff. He used the funds to file a claim of municipality for his property at the west end of Worth Avenue, current site of the Everglades Club.
  3. 1911. In the course of gaining land and permission to build a second bridge, developers got wind of West Palm Beach’s intention to annex the island. The new town was formed in order to escape becoming the eastern part of West Palm Beach.
  4. 1903. After an inferno destroyed the wood-framed Breakers, town leaders decided to incorporate – not for the purpose of being governed (to which they strongly objected) but so taxes could be collected to support a proper fire department.

28840810.jpgThe answer? 1911. Former state legislator and Palm Beach pioneer Elisha Dimick, with a consortium of other speculators, formed the Palm Beach Improvement Company and planned to build homes near what is now Royal Palm Way. But they didn’t want to bring their potential buyers over Flagler’s bridge, so they needed to build a new one. When they inquired about buying a parcel on the west side of Lake Worth, they learned of the city’s planned land grab. Within three months, Palm Beach became a town and “Cap” Dimick its first mayor. And yes, that’s Dimick who greets you as you drive over the Royal Park Bridge. (Photo courtesy of The Palm Beach Daily News.)

Oh, and the story about Alligator Joe? Only partly true. He did – as instructed – capture and kill an 11-footer for Sir Colbrooke to take to the taxidermist for the trophy room back home in England. But Joe was paid just $25 for his trouble.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

The Brazilian Court Gets Applause

 

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Travel+Leisure readers have spoken, and they’ve decreed The Brazilian Court to be one of Florida’s 10 best resort hotel properties.

It can’t hurt that the condominium-hotel is home to Daniel Boulud’s Café Boulud. But readers of the venerated travel magazine ranked hotels based on service, location and amenities as well as food & beverage.

We have no shortage of luxury resorts on the island, and each one has its particular niche. We love Brazilian Court’s (impeccably restored) Mediterranean architecture, its intimate vibe and its lush courtyards. It’s a landmark.

The Brazilian Court is located at 301 Australian Avenue, meaning it’s three blocks from everything – Worth Avenue, the ocean, the Intracoastal. Visit the website to learn more. Better yet, visit Palm Beach and stay the night.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

Politics and Culture at The Four Arts

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Actor Jim Carter (Mr. Carson on “Downton Abbey”) speaks February 21.

It’s out: The Society of the Four Arts has released its 2017 Esther B O’Keeffe Lecture Series schedule, the premier bit of programming in the Four Arts calendar.

The series, which centers around politics, media and culture, meets on Tuesdays at 3 p.m. Lectures are free for members, and $35 tickets become available to non-members one hour before each event. Thinking of joining? Four Arts membership is carefully limited to match the number of seats available in its auditorium. There’s a two- to three-year waiting list, and your application must be sponsored by two current members.

Here’s a quick look at the lineup. Find complete details on the Four Arts website:

January 10: “What the President Needs to Know to Combat Terrorism” by author and scholar Victor Davis Hanson.

January 17: “A Retrospective Look at America in the 1980s” by New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik.

January 24: “In Defense of the Humanities” by National Humanities Medal-winner Rebecca Goldstein.

January 31: “Bringing America Back Together” by Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.

February 7: “First Ladies, from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama” by author and journalist Kate Andersen Brower.

February 14: “Fathers and Sons in Literature and History” by Frank Bruni, New York Times columnist.

February 21: “Tales from Downton Abbey” by Jim Carter, the actor best known for his role as Mr. Carson on the most popular drama in PBS history.

February 28: “Isabella Stewart Gardner: Her Collection and Museum” by Marlene Strauss, art lecturer.

March 7: “In Defense of Criticism” by A.O. Scott, chief film critic for The New York Times.

March 14: “The American Unwinding and the New Administration” by George Packer, American journalist, novelist and playwright.

March 21: “Is Asia Lost to China?” by Wall Street Journal editorial board member Mary Kissel.

March 28: “Syria and the Western Jihadi: Tales from the Front” by CNN foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

Help Us Help the Homeless

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On any given day, nearly 1,500 people in Palm Beach County are homeless. That’s down from 2013 numbers. But it’s still 1,500 too many.

Please, take a few moments to help. Our publisher, the Palm Beach Board of Realtors, is partnering with the Homeless Coalition of Palm Beach County to provide basic necessities to the men, women and children who survive without a place to call home.

Think of it. When you live somewhere not meant for human habitation, how in the world are you to keep your underthings clean? How long will your socks last, when you only have one pair?

We’re collecting new socks, underwear and plain white T-shirts of all sizes (XS-3X) for children, women and men. We’re happy to do the shopping for you, if you’d like to make a cash donation. Our goal? To help prepare children to go back to school and their parents to find or return to work, something they cannot do without basic necessities.

Please drop donations at the Palm Beach Board of Realtors, 140 Royal Palm Way, Suite 205, Palm Beach, FL 33480, or mail a check with “Homeless Coalition” written in the memo. For more information, email or call Executive Vice President Tracy Mallette at 561-659-3810.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

The Northwood Art Experience

Featuring both emerging and established artists, the monthly Historic Northwood Village Art Walk weaves in and out of the village’s art galleries and past the many murals that adorn the art district’s buildings.

Held the second Saturday of each month, the tours begin with an introduction to the history of Northwood Village, and then visit an art district that now boasts a unique mix of gallery spaces, antiques shops, boutiques, and restaurants. Sip a glass of wine and enjoy light appetizers while artists give demonstrations or lecture on art-related topics.

The 90-minute tours are free of charge, but you must reserve a spot. Space is limited to 20 people per tour. Register online or call 561-506-4108 to make arrangements for a private group tour.

The next Historic Northwood Village Art Walk will be this coming Saturday, July 9, at 6 and 7:30 p.m.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.

 

 

2016 – 240 = 1776, the Musical

We tend to think American political animosity is a modern invention.

Untrue.

Jefferson and Hamilton loathed one another, and later, Jefferson and Adams loathed one another. Revolutionaries and Loyalists fought like cats and dogs (or like Clintons and Trumps). George Washington longed for respectful discourse, and almost nobody obliged.

In light of the current political atmosphere, Palm Beach Dramaworks is giving us 1776, in a fully staged production that relies upon nearly all of its cast members to play two characters. It’s a bow to the limited space in Dramaworks’ 218-seat theater, but the performance also asks actors to dig deep as they each portray characters with diametrically opposed viewpoints. (According to longtime area theater critic Hap Erstein, some achieve this more effectively than others.)

Clay Cartland plays both Thomas Jefferson and Georgia representative Lyman Hall. He describes a scene in which the secretary of the Second Continental Congress reads “a long list of useless committees.” Cartland says, “A lot of the themes still apply today. You know, you could turn on C-Span and see the same things, except people are wearing suits instead of waistcoats.”

The show opened Friday, July 1, and runs through July 24. Buy tickets online or call the box office at 561-514-4042, ext. 2.


pbbor-tree-bwPublished monthly, the Palm Beach Real Estate Guide showcases available Palm Beach real estate, from estates and historic homes to in-town flats and waterfront high-rises. Subscribe or contact us.